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Offline IjazAhmad

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The Spirit (Ruh)
« on: December 23, 2014, 03:14:12 AM »
As-salaamu 'alaikum brothers and sisters ;D

The Quran refer many times to the Spirit (Ruh), what is the difference between Islam and Christianity about this? Is the Spirit a part of God? or is it a another creation which God has created and uses it to blow in his creation (Bashar/Ins)? e.g. Adam and Jesus?

I was having a discourse with a Christian and he cited 4:171 to prove that Jesus is the spirit of God, thus he is god or a part of god (trinity). I honestly didn't understand him  :-\

Regards,
Your brother - Ijaz A.

Offline Duster

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Re: The Spirit (Ruh)
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2014, 11:11:36 PM »
Shalom / Peace bro ...maybe this article by bro joseph can help????? >>>>>What is the Quranic Ruh (Spirit)? >>>>>http://quransmessage.com/articles/ruh%20FM3.htm

Offline HOPE

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Re: The Spirit (Ruh)
« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2014, 02:02:49 AM »
Peace brothers,

Here is Karen Armstong on the subject:

The Ruh/Rouh of Allah (SWT)
"This brings me to a difficult point. Because this God began as a specifically male deity, monotheists have usually referred to it as “he.” In recent years, feminists have understandably objected to this. . . . Yet it is perhaps worth mentioning that the masculine tenor of God-talk is particularly problematic in English. In Hebrew, Arabic and French, however, grammatical gender gives theological discourse a sort of sexual counterpoint and dialectic, which provides a balance that is often lacking in English. Thus in Arabic al-Lah (the supreme name for God) is grammatically masculine, but the word for the divine and inscrutable essence of God—al-Dhat—is feminine.” - Karen Armstrong, A History of God


Surah 17:85-86

They ask thee concerning the Spirit.
Say: "The Spirit (cometh) by command of my Lord:
Of knowledge it is only a little that is communicated to you."
If it were Our* Will, We* could take away that which We* have sent thee by inspiration:
Then wouldst thou find none to plead thy affair in that matter against Us.


[2.87] We* gave Moses the Book and followed him up with a succession of Messengers;
We* gave Jesus, the son of Mary, Clear (Signs) and strengthened him with the Holy Spirit.


[2.253] Those Messengers we endowed with gifts, some above others: 
To one of them Allah spoke; others He raised to degrees (of honor); 
To Jesus, the son of Mary, We* gave Clear (Signs), and strengthened him with the Holy Spirit.

[4.171] O People of the Book! Commit no excesses in your religion: nor say of Allah aught but the truth.
Christ Jesus the son of Mary was a Messenger of Allah, and His Word, which He bestowed on Mary,
And a Spirit proceeding from Him.
Al Nisa (The Women)


[5.110] Then will Allah say: “O Jesus the son of Mary! Recount My favour to thee and to thy mother.
Behold! I strengthened thee with the Holy Spirit, so that thou didst speak to the people in childhood and in maturity.

[15.29] When I have fashioned him and breathed into him of My spirit*, fall ye down in obeisance unto him. Al Hijr (The Rock)
[16.102] Say: The Holy Spirit has brought the revelation from thy Lord in Truth,
In order to strengthen those who believe and as a Guide and Glad Tidings to Muslims.

[26.192-96] Verily this is a Revelation from the Lord of the Worlds: With it came down the Spirit of Faith and truth — 
To thy heart and mind, that thou mayest admonish in the perspicuous Arabic tongue. 
Without doubt it is (announced) in the Revealed Books of the former peoples.

[32.9] But he fashioned him in due proportion, and breathed into him something of His spirit.
And He gave you (the facilities of) hearing and sight and feeling (and understanding): Little thanks do ye give!



[38.72] When I fashioned him (in due proportion) and breathed into him of My spirit*, fall ye down in obeisance unto him.



[66:12] And Mary, Imran's daughter, who guarded her virginity, so We* breathed into her of Our Spirit*, and she confirmed the Words of her Lord and His Books, and became one of the obedient.


[21:107] “And We* did not send you (O Muhammad) except as a mercy to the world.”


15:85] “We* created not the heavens, the earth, and all between them, but for just ends. And the Hour is surely coming”


[2.2] This is the Book; in it is guidance sure, without doubt, to those who fear Allah. Who believe in the Unseen, are steadfast in prayer, and spend out of what We* have provided for them;


[15:9] “We* have, without doubt, sent down the Message; and We* will assuredly guard it (from corruption).”


[50.43] Verily it is We* who give life and death;
And to Us* is the Final Goal.


[37:171-177] “Already has Our* Word been passed before (this) to Our* Servants sent (by Us). That they would certainly be assisted. And that Our* forces, they surely must conquer. So turn thou away from them for a little while. And watch them (how they fare), and they soon shall see. Do they wish (indeed) to hurry on our Punishment? But when it descends into the open space before them, evil will be the morning for those who were warned (and heeded not).


* Allah and His Ruh (There are hundreds of such examples)


"God was not booming clear instructions from on high. The divine voice constantly changed the way it referred to itself—as "we," "he," "your lord," "Allah" or "I"—shifting its relationship to both the Prophet and his audience. Nor was God distinctively male. Each recitation began with the invocation: "In the name of Allah, the Compassionate ('al-Rahman') and the Merciful ('al-Rahim')." Allah was a masculine noun, but the divine names al-Rahman and al-Rahim are not only grammatically feminine but related etymologically to the word for womb."

Karen Armstrong, Muhammad (Prophet For Our Time)
Chapter 2, 'Jahiliyyah', p.60
Harper Perennial - London, New York, Toronto and Sydney
>


“Even though Jews and Muslims both find the Christian doctrines of the Trinity and Incarnation almost blasphemous, they have produced their own versions of these controversial theologies. Each expression of these universal themes is slightly different, however, showing the ingenuity and inventiveness of the human imagination as it struggles to express its sense of “God.”

Because this is such a big subject, I have deliberately confined myself to the One God worshipped by Jews, Christians and Muslims, though I have occasionally considered pagan, Hindu and Buddhist conceptions of ultimate reality to make a monotheistic point clearer. It seems that the idea of God is remarkably close to the ideas in religions that developed quite independently. . . . Mystics have seen God incarnated in a woman, for example. Others reverently speak of God’s sexuality and have introduced a female element into the divine.

This brings me to a difficult point. Because this God began as a specifically male deity, monotheists have usually referred to it as “he.” In recent years, feminists have understandably objected to this. . . . Yet it is perhaps worth mentioning that the masculine tenor of God-talk is particularly problematic in English. In Hebrew, Arabic and French, however, grammatical gender gives theological discourse a sort of sexual counterpoint and dialectic, which provides a balance that is often lacking in English. Thus in Arabic al-Lah (the supreme name for God) is grammatically masculine, but the word for the divine and inscrutable essence of God—al-Dhat—is feminine.”

Karen Armstrong, A History of God, Ballantine Books, 1993, p. xxi-xxiii.


"It is true that there is plenty of material in the Koran that is more egalitarian than the western Christian tradition, which was heavily influenced by the misogyny of Greek thought. Perhaps the most fundamental is that the Islamic God does not have a gender. Arabic may refer to him by use of the male pronoun, but he is never described as "father" or "lord" as he is in the Judaeo-Christian tradition. Indeed, the Islamic God has characteristics that are expressly feminine; one of his most important "names" is al-Rahman (the All-Compassionate) from the Arabic rahma, which comes from the word rahim, meaning womb. In Islamic mysticism, the divinely beloved is female."

Saturday December 8, 2001
The Guardian
"Hope is like a bird that senses the dawn and carefully starts to sing while it is still dark"

Offline Joseph Islam

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Re: The Spirit (Ruh)
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2015, 09:40:03 AM »
Dear IjazAhmad

Wa alaikum assalam

Please see the following article where I have discussed aspects of your question:

WHAT IS THE QURANIC RUH (SPIRIT)?
http://quransmessage.com/articles/ruh%20FM3.htm

I hope this helps, God willing.

Regards,
Joseph
'During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act' 
George Orwell

Offline Ad Sep

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Qur'an: The Spirit (Ruh) and Q-Chakras
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2023, 05:12:52 PM »
file:///home/adel/Documents/The%20Q-Chakras-2AE.pdf
/home/adel/Documents/The Q-Chakras-3A.pdf