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Offline IjazAhmad

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What is the difference between Salaat and Du'a?
« on: February 25, 2015, 10:17:24 PM »
As-salaamu 'alaikum br. Joseph!

What is the difference between Salaat and Du'a? Some Muslims assert that Salaat can't mean prayer because the word Du'a means prayer...

Regards,
Ijaz

Offline Joseph Islam

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Re: What is the difference between Salaat and Du'a?
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2015, 10:42:15 PM »
Dear brother Ijaz,

Wa alaikum assalam

Salaat is a formal gathering for the worship of God prescribed at certain parts of the day (4:103).

It has at its crux 'dhikr' which is understood in its general sense as 'remembrance of God' which includes the nuance of to praise, to magnify, to extol and to give status.  Salaat also consists of invocations such as to cry out to God, supplications in His name, to invoke God etc (dua).

One can arguably make 'dua' at any time of the day asking God for assistance or to call out to Him. It is not time / necessarily congregation based.
Albeit 'dua' is also a part of salaat, the latter (salaat) is a formal assimilation of worshippers which also includes magnifying God along with specific guiding conditions as below:


  • The details of ablution (4:43; 5:6)
  • A need for a direction - Qiblah, specific for the ‘believers’ (Mu'mins) (2.143-44)
  • Garments (7:31)
  • Allusion of times: (4:103; 11:114; 17:78; 24:58; 30:18; 2:238: 20:58)
  • That prayers must be observed on time (4:103)
  • Followers of the previous scripture to observe their Qiblah and the Believers (Mu’mins) their own Qiblah (2:145)
  • Prayer involves prostration (Sujood - 4:102; 48:29)
  • There is more than one prayer (Prayer in plural used - Salawat) (2:238)
  • There is a general form to prayer (2:238-39)
  • Standing position (3:39; 4:102)
  • Bowing down and prostrating (4:102; 22:26; 38:24; 48:29)
  • Form is not required during times of emergencies, fear, and unusual circumstances (2:239)
  • A mention of a call to prayer and congregation prayer (62:9)
  • A warning not to abandon prayer as was done by people before (19:58-59) but to establish prayer (Numerous references)
  • The purpose of prayer - To remember God alone (6:162; 20:14)
  • Prayer involves utterance (4:43)
  • The purpose to protect from sins (29:45)
  • What to do in danger and the shortening of prayer (4:101)
  • Garments and mention of a Masjid, or a place of prayer (7:31)
  • The tone of prayer (17:110)
  • There is a leader of prayer (4:102)

Thus in short, 'salaat' includes 'dua' but also has other components to it as discussed above. However, 'dua' on its own is not 'salaat' and neither does it have its components.

I hope that clarifies, God willing
Joseph
'During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act' 
George Orwell

Offline Wakas

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Re: What is the difference between Salaat and Du'a?
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2015, 07:29:54 AM »
salaam/peace Ijaz, all,

duaa means supplication/call/petition/prayer

It's meaning may overlap in some contexts with salat, however they are not equivalent. We know for example, duaa can be done anytime, whilst the regular/timed salat of the mumineen is a timed decree.

Some Muslims assert that Salaat can't mean prayer because the word Du'a means prayer...

Their assumption seems to be that Quran contains no words that overlap in meaning, and/or does not use synonyms etc. Such an explicit statement is not found in Quran.


With regard to salat, it is one of the most discussed subjects with much bias, interpolations, errors, assumptions, emotion, misrepresentations etc. I strongly recommend you verify all information you are given regarding salat from anyone, whether it is myself, brother Joseph, others etc.